Brown bengal kittens for sale

Donnellson woman wants Bengal cat(s) returned

DONNELLSON – A Donnellson woman is pleading with local officials to return several cats that were trapped near her property and taken away.Brown bengal kittens for sale

In a story that’s turning out to have more than nine lives of it’s own, Donnellson city officials, PAW animal shelter are all wrapped up in the relocation of “Mama”. … and apparently another cat that was taken to the country as a stray. Brown bengal kittens for sale

Brown bengal kittens for sale

Brown bengal kittens for sale

Debbie Gilman is a senior living in and out of a home in Donnellson and she has six cats, four licensed with the city. The cats are semi-secure, but Gilman admits they wander around into a field behind a neighbor’s home and could be wandering elsewhere.

Several of the cats living on Gilmans’ property are highly sought after Bengal cats. Bengals are from a lineage of Egyptian Maus and Asian Leopard cats. It’s not unheard of for these animals to go for more than $1,000 a piece.

The cats are energetic and inquisitive and are bred for revenue and have unique stripe and spot patterns similar to leopards.Brown bengal kittens for sale

Gilman said she has sold a few of the cats, but has been battling illnesses and just wants to retire to the countryside and live with the pets.

On or around Oct. 10, one or more of her cats were live trapped and taken away. One was taken on the 10th was called “Mama”, a pregnant Bengal that was taken by Donnellson City Clerk Rebecca Schau to the PAW Animal Shelter in Fort Madison.

The cats, according to everyone but Gilman, were taken from a neighbor’s garage in a live trap that was set up there. Gilman said she isn’t sure that’s the case. She said no one has shown her proof where they were trapped.

West Point/Donnellson Police Chief Brad Roberts said no trap was put on her property. He said the cats were trapped roaming in a neighbor’s garage after that resident called in a complaint that they were in the garage.

“We got a call from a citizen who said strays were in her garage and wanted to know if we could remove them. Our policy is to provide a live catch, and then if we catch them and they have tags we make an attempt to find the owner. If that’s not available we take the animal to PAW.”

However he said two of the cats weren’t taken to PAW because they were recorded as strays with no way of determining ownership.

“That’s what we recorded, that they were strays and they had somebody out there that said they would take them for mousers,” Roberts said.

Gillman said she saw a Donnellson city staffer with a live trap and confronted him about the missing cats when she arrived at her home later that week.

“He was carrying a live trap in his hand and I walked right up to him and said “Where are my cats,” she said. “He told me right there that Rebecca (Schau) took one to PAWs and the other two were taken out to the country and released.”

Schau confirmed she took one cat to PAW, but said no cats were taken out and released in the country to her knowledge.

Gilman has another neighbor helping her care for the cats as she’s in and out of the home dealing with medical issues.

PAW Director Sandy Brown took the pregnant Bengal cat in on Oct. 10 and then transferred it to another rescue out of the state on Oct. 17.

Gilman claims she contacted Brown immediately after confronting the Donnellson city employee to see about getting her cat back. Gilman said Brown told her she didn’t have any Bengals at the shelter, but she doesn’t remember the exact date of the call to Brown, other than it was about two weeks ago.

Brown said the shelter followed protocols with the animal and kept it seven days, when they are only required to keep it five for a property owner to come claim it.

“The cat was pregnant and it’s very stressful in here with the number of cats we have right now, so we sent it to a partner rescue that specializes in caring for pregnant cats,” Brown said.

Brown said she’s never spoken with the owner of the Bengal that was sent out, because there’s been no confirmation of who the owner is.

Brown said another male Bengal cat was in the shelter’s possession for about six weeks, before someone adopted it. She said the only time she’s spoken with Gilman was when the woman called about some of her cats being shot by someone in the neighborhood and asked advice on how to keep them safe. Brown bengal kittens for sale

Brown told her to make sure the cats are contained inside the property when she’s not there, are looked after, and are in good health.

“To me, this is all about the welfare of the animal and nothing else,” Brown said. “We still have not spoken to the owner of the cat so we did what was best for the animal.

“We’ve done nothing wrong here.”

Brown said she won’t consider trying to get the cat back because of the safety factor considering some of the other cats on the property have been shot and are known to roam the neighborhood.

Roberts confirmed at least one of Gilman’s cats had been shot and killed. Officers questioned neighbors but found no solid evidence to charge anyone with the shootings. One of the animals was shot in the neck while sitting on Gilman’s porch, according to the owner, but Roberts said her initial report of the incident had some inconsistencies.

Gilman also said one of the Bengal cats that was released in the country found its way home malnourished, but is doing better now. She just wants the others returned so she can get her life back to normal.

Once the animals are taken to the shelter, they are evaluated for health, fed and then spayed or neutered. No breeding value would remain with any cat taken to a rescue.

Gilman said that is of no concern to her as she has no intention of continuing to breed the animals due to her health.

“None of that matters to me. I just want “Mama” back,” she said.

Roberts said it’s unfortunate that this incident has garnered so much attention for his department, and for PAW.

“For us it’s scary, because they want to pick apart everything we do. There’s a risk of disease here and when they go into other properties and get into garbage they clearly are hungry and then can transfer disease,” Roberts said

“Our first priority is public safety and then to try and reunite the animal or animals with the proper owner. And it’s against city ordinance to let them run at large.”

He said the city has no way of housing nuisance animals and PAW has always been there to help protect and provide a temporary home for animals that are running at large.

Black bengal cat for sale

Looking For Bengal Cats For Sale – The Best Priced Snow Bengal Kitten Breeders in Miami, Florida & Los Angeles, California – Exotic Cats For Your Home

Black bengal cat for sale, The owners of f1savannahkittens.com & bengalcatbreeder.com have made it their mission to produce the friendliest, healthiest and most beautiful exotic brown, snow, silver and white bengal kittens in America. Black bengal cat for sale

THE ORIGIN OF THE BENGAL
Bengals are a domestic breed of cat obtained by crossing the wild Asian Leopard Cat, (Prionailurus bengalensis) with the domestic cat.  Snow or white bengal cats are white coated bengals with black rosettes. Silver bengal cats have a silver coat with black rosettes. Black bengal cat for sale

However, Bengals were created to give the exotic look of the Asian Leopard Cat but without the size and the danger that can come with owning one.

When an Asian Leopard Cat is crossed with a domestic cat, the resulting offspring are known as first-generation, or F1. To be officially classified as a domestic Bengal cat, a Bengal must be at least four generations away from the original cross.

WHAT ABOUT THAT FIRST F1 CROSS?
The F1’s have a reputation of being temperamental and unfriendly but this is not necessarily the case. Lots of handling as kittens means that they can grow up to be just as loving and docile as the later generations, depending somewhat on how much of the wild blood they inherit.

WHAT DO BENGALS LOOK LIKE?
Bengals are long, muscular cats. with sturdy bones. They are about the same size as a domestic cat, with a weight range of 10- 30 pounds (3-6 kilograms) and a height range of 13-16 inches, (33-40 centimeters). Their hind legs are slightly longer than their front legs which gives them a beautiful, powerful movement.

So, The coats and markings of the Bengals are spectacular. They look like little leopards with their distinctive spots. The clouded Bengal is particularly spectacular with its large spots, also known as rosettes, giving them very much the look of the enigmatic Clouded Leopard.

The coat colors are also beautiful. Snow, silver, mink, and brown, with variations on the coloring of each are all possible.

WHAT TYPE OF PERSONALITY DO BENGALS HAVE?
The Bengal may look like a wild cat but they can be as friendly and lovable as any domestic cat. They are full of life and can be quite people orientated. Bengals are playful, gregarious, and energetic cats with a generous dose of feline curiosity. They form strong bonds of love and loyalty with their families.

ARE BENGALS MORE INTELLIGENT THAN AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD CATS?
Bengals are as sharp as furry little tacks! They have a jungle survivor instinct that makes them super smart as well as having lightning reflexes. They are curious, highly active cats that are constantly on the move. They love playing fetch, playing chase, and are very quick at learning new tricks. They can even learn to turn light switches on and off, open doors, and flush toilets. Life is never boring when there is a Bengal in it.

However, Because of their wild ancestor’s habit of eliminating in water to hide their scent, some Bengal even learn to use the toilet!

CAN BENGALS LEARN TO WALK ON A LEASH?
Yes, they can. They are easier to train to walk on a leash than your average house cat.
Start off with small steps, indoors.

HOW DOES OUR CATTERY RAISE OUR BENGAL KITTENS?
We shower all of our kittens with love and affection in our home before they are ready to go to their forever homes. We would love for you to visit our website to set up a consultation.
Smart, energetic, spectacular, and loving, having one of our Bengals in your life is something you will never regret.

Contact:

Silver bengal kittens for sale near me

Gone fishing: the fight to save one of the world’s most elusive wild cats

Silver bengal kittens for sale near me, With webbed feet and a tail for a rudder, Asia’s fishing cats face shrinking habitats. But conservation efforts in West Bengal are helping it swim against the tide

or more than a decade, wildlife biologist Tiasa Adhya has spent many a day in the wetlands and mangroves of the Indian states of West Bengal and Odisha, looking for signs of a rarely seen wild cat – the fishing cat (Prionailurus viverrinus). Silver bengal kittens for sale near me

Fishing cats are fascinating animals,” she says. “They have co-inhabited riverine deltas and floodplains alongside humans for centuries. Ancient cultures like the Khmer empire show evidence of fishing cats.” As co-founder of the world’s longest-running fishing cat research and conservation project, Kolkata-based Adhya is dedicated to this endangered felid, one of the least-studied and understood wildcats.

“When we began our work in 2010, very little was known about these cats, both to us and the local communities,” Adhya says of The Fishing Cat Project (TFCP). Today, the species is slightly better understood and appreciated, though it still receives significantly less attention than its larger, more charismatic cousins.

study of small cats in November found “many small, rare and elusive cats in the Indian subcontinent don’t get as much attention as the more spectacular big cats. Nevertheless, the need to protect them is just as pressing.” The study, by Sweden’s Uppsala University, found only 6–11% of the areas where three rare cat species – including the fishing cat – have their habitat are protected.

Silver bengal kittens for sale near me

Silver bengal kittens for sale near me

A muscular, medium-sized cat, about twice the size of a household one, the fishing cat has adapted to a semi-aquatic lifestyle. It hunts from the water’s edge, either scooping out fish with its paws or diving into shallow waters.

“The fishing cat has evolved to be the top predator in its habitat,” says Adhya. “It has half-retractile claws which help it hook fish, while its partly-webbed feet enable it to have a strong grip in muddy terrain. It also has a water-resistant coat, a rudder-like tail, and other adaptations that help it swim effortlessly.”

In 2020, fishing cat scientists, researchers and conservationists from around the world came together to form the Fishing Cat Conservation Alliance. The nonprofit has declared the month of February Fishing Cat February to raise awareness of the mammal and support conservation efforts.

Currently, there are no population counts at either national or global level but the fishing cat is named on the International Union for Conservation of Nature red list as vulnerable, with its numbers decreasing due to multiple threats.

In India, the fishing cat is listed under the Wildlife (Protection) Act of 1972 and receives the same level of legal protection as the tiger, the elephant and other threatened fauna. However, more than 90% of the cat’s range is outside protected areas and negative interactions are inevitable in human-dominated landscapes.

Adhya’s project focuses on the conservation of fishing cats in the wetlands and mangroves of West Bengal and Odisha, states along the east coast of India that form a significant portion of the species’ distribution range in the country. In West Bengal, the cat is known as machbagha (Bengali for fish-tiger).

To create awareness about the felid, TFCP has initiated several conservation projects in the local community. “After the fishing cat was declared the state animal of West Bengal in 2012, we worked on instilling a sense of pride and ownership in people,” says Adhya.

As part of a programme called Know Thy Neighbours in 2017, camera traps were installed in the back yards of village homes in areas fishing cats were known to frequent. Villagers were shown the camera footage and taught how to identify the individual cats visiting their homes based on body markings. They were encouraged to name the cat, leading the villagers, especially the children, to develop a bond with their visitors. “Once children are excited about conservation, it’s easy to get the whole family involved. Today, the villagers are the eyes and ears of our conservation work,” says Adhya.

Baraju Behera, a fisher from Soran village on the fringes of Odisha’s Chilika Lake, helped set up four camera traps in his neighbourhood in 2017. “Before the camera traps, we had no idea about the fishing cats visiting our village. Now I’ve observed several individuals. I’ve named my favourite fishing cat Raja [king],” he says.

Despite their preference for fish, fishing cats have a varied diet. They have been recorded consuming molluscs, crabs, frogs, snakes and birds. They are also known to eat chickens and small goats from people’s yards.

To reduce the number of retaliatory attacks against fishing cats triggered by livestock depredation, TFCP supports a community goat bank project in Howrah district, West Bengal. It was launched in 2017 on the suggestion of local NGO Sarada Prasad Tirtha Janakalyan Samity (SPTJS). Thirty-eight families were given a pregnant female goat each, with the understanding that one kid from the litter would be donated to the goat bank.

On average, the community loses five to six goats a year to fishing cats. When an incident is recorded, the aggrieved family receives a replacement animal from the goat bank, a project entirely managed by the villagers themselves. Joydeb Pradhan, president of SPTJS, says: “For the villagers, the replacement goat is not the same as the beloved animal they have just lost. But at least now, they are not as upset.”

The biggest threat to the fishing cat, however, is the degradation and loss of its habitat. “In the past two decades, over 50% of the Gangetic floodplain has been lost to urbanisation, infrastructure projects, industries and aquaculture,” says Adhya.

Silver bengal kittens for sale near me

Silver bengal kittens for sale near me

Rising tide: why the crocodile-like gharial is returning to India’s rivers

The situation is not very different in the nine other countries across south and south-east Asia where records show the presence of the fishing cat. These nations are signatories to the Ramsar convention on wetlands, but the felid’s habitat is still threatened.

Adhya says: “Wetlands are highly productive and rich ecosystems capable of supporting diverse life forms. We are actively working with government authorities, forest officials and policymakers to ensure that they are protected.

“Wetlands are not only water reservoirs. They also serve as nutrient traps and carbon sinks, which are essential for fighting climate change.”

Last October, Chilika – the second largest coastal lagoon in the world – adopted the fishing cat as its ambassador. Susanta Nanda, chief executive of the Chilika Development Authority (CDA), says: “When we work on protecting the apex predator in a habitat, in this case the fishing cat, we end up protecting the entire ecosystem.”

In collaboration with TFCP and volunteers from the community, the CDA will soon be installing 100 camera traps across the lagoon to help establish fishing cat numbers and improve protection of this little-known creature.

Find more age of extinction coverage here, and follow biodiversity reporters Phoebe Weston and Patrick Greenfield on Twitter for all the latest news and features

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